cellar

red bubbles

jan 2021

2020 was my fourth vintage creating pet-nats, so I was excited to try a few new things, one being, sparkling red wine. I was inspired by the many Lambruscos I’ve enjoyed over the years and wanted to make something in that spirit. Lambrusco is often made in the same style as prosecco, using the charmat method, which takes a finished wine through a second fermentation in-tank.

red bubbles

For our new sparkling Syrah, we harvested the grapes early and used whole cluster carbonic maceration for 10 days prior to pressing. With minimal tannin from skin contact, you get that super juicy, fruit profile.

red bubbles

After pressing, the fermenting wine continued its fermentation in stainless steel. Rather than bottling this wine near the end of fermentation and disgorging after a few months, we placed the wine in a pressure tank to finish its primary fermentation. This allowed the wine to self-carbonate. After a settling period we bottled the wine unfined and unfiltered from this same tank using a counter pressure bottler with no additives or SO2 during any stage of the winemaking process. The result is a light, nuanced, fruit-forward sparkling red.

red bubbles

Varietal: Syrah
Vintage: 2020
Vineyard: Conley Vineyard
AVA: Columbia Valley
Farming Practices: Certified Organic
Alcohol: 10%
Yeast: Indigenous
Sulfur: 0
Filter: 0
Fining: 0
Aromatics: funk, raspberry coulis
Palate: cranberry, pomegranate, rye
Format: 750mL
Cases Produced: 55

red bubbles

native fermentation

sep 2020

Every pét project wine is fermented naturally, utilizing wild indiginous yeast from the vineyard, as opposed to cultured lab yeast. I opt to use a pied de cuve to begin each fermentation- it’s a small, "starter" from the vineyard- which I begin in advance of the bulk fermentation. I often compare this method to baking sourdough bread with a starter. Using this technique helps build up a healthy and diverse natural yeast population, allowing the primary fermentation to take off strong.

native fermentation

I have been asked on occasion if this process yields the same result as leaving the grapes and must to ferment on their own, completely untouched. In fact, it can be almost the exact same result, however, using a pied de cuve is more intentional, it promotes a healthier fermentation and in my opinion adds an element of intention to an otherwise uncontrolled process.

native fermentation

To make the pied de cuve, I pick about 25 lbs of exceptionally healthy looking fruit at the vineyard about a week before harvest. I hand destem this fruit into a large-mouth glass carboy and use what looks like an oversized potato masher (it’s actually a large potato masher) to crush the fruit and make a mash of juice and skins.

native fermentation

The environmental yeasts get to work and after 3-4 days the fermentation really starts bubbling away. I do a series of mini-punch downs to wet the cap and introduce oxygen before lightly pressing and straining off the fermenting liquid to add to the harvested fruit in a whole-cluster format or to recently pressed juice depending on the intended direction of a given wine. The result is stylistically consistent, yet the product is always unique and the quality of the wine depends entirely on the quality of the raw material from the vineyard.

native fermentation

piquettes

apr 2020

A piquette is a wine-like beverage made from pomace (skins, pulp, seeds, and stems) of recently pressed grapes. The pressed grapes are rehydrated with water, allowed to macerate for a time, then pressed again. This liquid is fermented and bottled quickly. The result is a beverage with an alcohol content of 4-9% abv as compared to our pét-nats which are typically between 10-12% abv.

piquettes

Historically, piquettes intended to be consumed by field workers and a more affordable alternative to wine. Piquettes can be wildly diverse, with no consistent varietal, blend, or firm tradition associated with the style. It is great territory for experimentation! I have often described piquettes to people who have not tried them as being like a hybrid between sour beer and a wine spritzer. Or, what hard seltzer would be like if it were made with the thoughtfulness of craft beer and wine.

piquettes

Our first piquette, released in 2019, was made from the pressings of Pinot Noir. With 2 days on the pomace this piquette has a bright pink color and cranberry-pomegranate flavor profile. Our 2020 piquette was made from pressings of our Gewurztraminer pet-nat, which had a little carbonic maceration in the fermentation process. The acid level is wonderfully high and the aromatics are off the charts with floral notes and citrus zest.

piquettes

These wine-like beverages are drinkable beyond belief, and because of their low cost of production and single-serve size, they are a no-brainer for the summer. The perfect refreshing drink to enjoy on the patio while watching the days grows warmer.

piquettes